Mobile phones aim to be a 'doctor in your pocket'

February 19, 2009 by Katell Abiven
Vittorio Colao CEO of Vodafone attends a conference during the Mobile World Congress (GSMA) in Barcelona, on February 17. The Rockefeller Foundation, the UN Foundation and The Vodafone Foundation announced the Mobile Health (mHealth) Alliance this week, a partnership to advance the use of mobile technology in healthcare.

Not content with offering calls, texts and Internet access, the mobile phone industry is convinced it can help save lives and offer health services to millions worldwide.

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