Largest-ever study of US child health begins

January 13, 2009 By LAURAN NEERGAARD , AP Medical Writer

(AP) -- Scientists begin recruiting mothers-to-be in North Carolina and New York this week for the largest study of U.S. children ever performed - aiming eventually to track 100,000 around the country from conception to age 21.



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