Digital TV subsidy program running out of money

January 2, 2009 By JOELLE TESSLER , AP Technology Writer

(AP) -- The Feb. 17 transition from analog to digital television broadcasts looms and as many as 8 million households are still unprepared, but the government program that subsidizes crucial TV converter boxes is about to run out of money.

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not rated yet Jan 02, 2009
Think positive: those who lose their TV may then rationally choose to watch less TV, resulting in them getting out more, using more interactive media or become more fit! Given its place as the opiate of the masses, fewer high people may be a good thing.

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