Japanese researchers make brain tissues from stem cells

November 6, 2008
Image of a functional human brain tissue made from stem cells
A handout released from Japan's natural science research center Riken shows a functional human brain tissue made from stem cells at their laboratory in Kobe. Japanese researchers said they had created functioning human brain tissues from stem cells, a world first that has raised new hopes for the treatment of disease.

Japanese researchers said Thursday they had created functioning human brain tissues from stem cells, a world first that has raised new hopes for the treatment of disease.



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