Sprint to join rivals in cutting termination fees

October 21, 2008 By DAVID TWIDDY , AP Business Writer

(AP) -- Following its rivals, Sprint Nextel Corp. will soon begin trimming the fees customers face for canceling their cell phone service early.

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