Scientists say stick bug is world's longest insect

Oct 17, 2008 By RAPHAEL G. SATTER , Associated Press Writer
In this undated picture made available Thursday, Oct. 16, 2008 by Britain's Natural History Museum, a giant stick insect named Phobaeticus chani, meaning "Chan's megastick." is seen. Britain's Natural History Museum says a Malaysian amateur naturalist has discovered the world\'s longest insect, the more than 22-inch long "megastick." The museum says the oversized walking stick bug was discovered by Datuk Chan Chew Lun on the Malaysian island of Borneo. (AP Photo/Natural History Museum)

(AP) -- A stick bug from the island of Borneo measuring well over a foot in length has been identified by researchers as the world's longest insect, British scientists said Thursday.



Content from The Associated Press expires 15 days after original publication date. For more information about The Associated Press, please visit www.ap.org .

Explore further: English foxes safe for now as Cameron backs down

Related Stories

Scientists announce top 10 new species for 2015

10 hours ago

A cartwheeling spider, a bird-like dinosaur and a fish that wriggles around on the sea floor to create a circular nesting site are among the species identified by the SUNY College of Environmental Science ...

Early hominids ate just about everything

Feb 17, 2015

Reconstructions of human evolution are prone to simple, overly-tidy scenarios. Our ancestors, for example, stood on two legs to look over tall grass, or began to speak because, well, they finally had something ...

If you could clone yourself, would you still have sex?

Feb 13, 2015

Imagine how easy life would be if you could produce offspring without a mate. Sexual reproduction is the most common mating system in the animal kingdom. But in many species, females do not require males ...

First steps for Hector the robot stick insect

Dec 16, 2014

A research team at Bielefeld University has succeeded in teaching the only robot of its kind in the world how to walk. Its first steps have been recorded in a video. The robot is called Hector, and its construction ...

Recommended for you

English foxes safe for now as Cameron backs down

3 hours ago

English foxes won a temporary respite after Prime Minister David Cameron's promise to repeal a ban on hunting them failed to make it into his programme outlined in the Queen's Speech on Wednesday.

Sex chromosomes—why the Y genes matter

3 hours ago

Several genes have been lost from the Y chromosome in humans and other mammals, according to research published in the open access journal Genome Biology. The study shows that essential Y genes are rescue ...

How longhorned beetles find Mr. Right

4 hours ago

A longhorned beetle's sexy scent might make a female perk up her antennae. But when the males of several species all smell the same, a female cannot choose by cologne alone.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Keter
1 / 5 (1) Oct 17, 2008
I'm sorry, but back in the early '70s, right around the end of the Vietnam war, my neighbor, an Air Force colonel, brought back some furniture and other odds and ends from "country" - and along for the ride was a very large variety of walking stick. Six legged, between six inches a little over a foot in length, with a body the diameter of a normal #2 pencil. These things were yellow and green when they first arrived here - yellow bodies with green at the joints - think camouflage for living in bamboo. This same neighbor then treated his back 40 with herbicide in "US Gov't" drums (probably Agent Orange) to get rid of a stand of 8' tall Johnson Grass which had grown up in his absence - and the things mutated. I won't go into details here, but suffice it to say that they became aggressive and nearly unkillable - you had to chop them up with a hoe and still the pieces came at you...thank God they apparently underwent a fatal mutation after about 5 generations. No. This is NOT the longest insect. Those were longer and a lot scarier.
dshows
not rated yet Oct 17, 2008
Doubtful but ok. The herbicide had nothing to do with them not dying. Insects in general dont die easily.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.