New DNA Tool Probes Rice Genome

October 21, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new tool for investigating the rice genome has been developed by researchers at UC Davis led by Pamela Ronald, professor of plant pathology. The inexpensive, publicly-available rice DNA microarray covers nearly all the 45,000 genes in the rice genome. Details are published this week in the journal PLoS (Public Library of Science) One.

In higher organisms, like humans or rice plants, each cell type express different genes at different times. Scientists have developed high-throughput methods to examine these gene expression profiles using "DNA microarrays," thousands of fragments of DNA fixed to a glass slide. DNA microarrays can be used to figure out which genes are important for responding to a stimulus or tolerating stresses.

Ronald and her colleagues used the new rice array to investigate gene expression changes when plants are grown in the light versus the dark. They then combined this gene expression data with biochemical pathway data to correctly predict a number of candidate gene products involved in carrying out photorespiration.

The methods and array developed in this paper will aid researchers in identifying the function of the 45,000 rice genes, only a few of which have so far been characterized, Ronald said. The group also has developed a Web-based program that allows the user to compare gene expression profiles across multiple rice microarray platforms, which will further accelerate this research.

Provided by UC Davis

Explore further: Human selection pressure on novel peptide aided domestication of asian rice

Related Stories

From happiness on Twitter to DNA organization

August 3, 2016

Twitter users who are happy tend to be more connected with other happy users. This is the confirmation of a property of social networks known as assortativity: a measure of to what extent people who tend to connect with each ...

Core proteins exert control over DNA function

June 21, 2016

The protein complex that holds strands of DNA in compact spools partially disassembles itself to help genes reveal themselves to specialized proteins and enzymes for activation, according to Rice University researchers and ...

DNA in 'unbiased' model curls both ways

June 14, 2016

In 1988, scientists in Switzerland looked through a microscope and saw something they didn't expect: two sections of an X-shaped chromosome spiraling in opposite directions. Now scientists at Rice University have confirmed ...

Recommended for you

First stars formed even later than previously thought

August 31, 2016

ESA's Planck satellite has revealed that the first stars in the Universe started forming later than previous observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background indicated. This new analysis also shows that these stars were the ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.