Bullying common in cyberspace

October 2, 2008

A new study in the Journal of School Health reveals that cyberbullying is common among teens who are frequent internet users, with 72 percent of respondents reporting at least one incident during the past year.

Online bullying was associated with increased distress, as well as with in-school bullying, with 85 percent of respondents who reported at least one online incident also reporting being bullied in school. Most of the bullied teens did not tell their parents about the online incidents. They felt the need to deal with the problem on their own and were fearful of parental restrictions on internet use.

These findings are based on an anonymous web-based survey of 1, 454 youth between the ages of 12 to 17, conducted by Jaana Juvonen, Ph.D., and Elisheva F. Gross, Ph.D., of the University of California, Los Angeles.

Source: Wiley

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