In Hurricane Ike, bumpy ride with bird's-eye view

September 12, 2008 By MARY FOSTER , Associated Press Writer

(AP) -- Amid the engines' roar, the Air Force Reserve pilots and navigator worked calmly as their huge plane neared the eyewall of Hurricane Ike. The gray cloud, looming 50,000 feet into the sky like a colossal concrete barrier was four miles thick, and the Lockheed WC-130J was hurtling into it.



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