Climate change: Floods, drought, mosquito disease aim at Europe

September 29, 2008
Forest fires in the South of France in 2003
Climate change will amplify the risk of flooding in northwestern Europe, water scarcity and forest fires on the northern Mediterranean rim and also extend the habitat range of virus-carrying mosquitoes, including the Asian tiger mosquito, seen here, which carries the chikungunya virus and other pathogens, it said.

Climate change will amplify the risk of flooding in northwestern Europe, water scarcity and forest fires on the northern Mediterranean rim and bring milder winters to Scandinavia, the European Environment Agency (EAA) said on Monday.



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5 comments

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mikiwud
3 / 5 (4) Sep 30, 2008
Mosquitoes do not need high temperatures to breed,ask anyone who has been to Siberia.There was a malaria epidemic there in the 20th century.
Some places will get more floods and so more droughts that is how it is,was and for ever will be.Get over it!
deepsand
2 / 5 (4) Oct 01, 2008
Mosquitoes do not need high temperatures to breed,ask anyone who has been to Siberia.There was a malaria epidemic there in the 20th century.

So, the greatest populations of mosquitoes are in cold climes?
Some places will get more floods and so more droughts that is how it is,was and for ever will be.

Relevance?
Get over it!

Get over yourself.
Velanarris
5 / 5 (2) Oct 02, 2008
Velanarris
5 / 5 (3) Oct 03, 2008
And BTW Droughts kill off mosquitos.
GrayMouser
not rated yet Oct 20, 2008
And Malaria is a temperate climate disease that was a big problem in Chicago, Washington DC, and much of Europe before it was killed off using DDT.

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