APS announces Physics, a new, free, online publication

September 19, 2008

The authoritative but brief reports in Physics on exciting and important new research will help keep researchers abreast of developments within and outside of their own fields and can catalyze interdisciplinary work. With the combined output of the APS peer-reviewed publications at about 18,000 papers a year, there is clearly a need to pull the truly exceptional papers out from among the merely excellent works, and place them in context.

"Our readers don't want to miss significant developments in other subfields of physics," says Gene Sprouse, APS Editor in Chief, "and our authors need and deserve more attention for their best papers." Physics aims to meet those needs by means of three features, all with original content. "Viewpoints" discuss and explain a particular paper's findings in a manner accessible to all physicists, especially to those outside its subspecialty. "Trends" are longer pieces that cover a recent body of work in a specific field, but also look ahead to the challenges and questions that fascinate that field's top researchers. "Synopses" are staff-written summaries of papers that merit wider attention among physicists in all fields.

"The selection process will be rigorous but not rigid," says David Voss, Physics' Editor. "We'll highlight papers that change the rules of the game, afford cross-disciplinary potential, or report a substantial breakthrough in a particular field." Feedback and suggestions by email to physics_at_aps.org are welcome.

In its beta test phase since July, Physics has featured 18 Viewpoints, 2 Trends, and over 25 Synopses. Future issues will introduce additional features and new ways for Physics to spotlight exceptional research.

Source: American Physical Society

Explore further: Afro-Brazilians search DNA for pre-slavery origins

Related Stories

Model shows how surge in wealth inequality may be reversed

July 30, 2015

(Phys.org)—For many Americans, the single biggest problem facing the country is the growing wealth inequality. Based on income tax data, wealth inequality in the US has steadily increased since the mid-1980s, with the top ...

Power grid forecasting tool reduces costly errors

July 30, 2015

Accurately forecasting future electricity needs is tricky, with sudden weather changes and other variables impacting projections minute by minute. Errors can have grave repercussions, from blackouts to high market costs. ...

How to look for a few good catalysts

July 30, 2015

Two key physical phenomena take place at the surfaces of materials: catalysis and wetting. A catalyst enhances the rate of chemical reactions; wetting refers to how liquids spread across a surface.

Japanese team fires world's most powerful laser

July 29, 2015

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers and engineers at Japan's Osaka University is reporting that they have successfully fired what they are claiming is the world's most powerful laser. In their paper published in the journal ...

Recommended for you

New device converts DC electric field to terahertz radiation

August 4, 2015

Terahertz radiation, the no-man's land of the electromagnetic spectrum, has long stymied researchers. Optical technologies can finagle light in the shorter-wavelength visible and infrared range, while electromagnetic techniques ...

The resplendent inflexibility of the rainbow

August 4, 2015

Children often ask simple questions that make you wonder if you really understand your subject. An young acquaintance of mine named Collin wondered why the colors of the rainbow were always in the same order—red, orange, ...

For faster battery charging, try a quantum battery?

August 3, 2015

(Phys.org)—Physicists have shown that a quantum battery—basically, a quantum system such as a qubit that stores energy in its quantum states—can theoretically be charged at a faster rate than conventional batteries. ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

E_L_Earnhardt
1 / 5 (1) Sep 21, 2008
I strongly suggest support for opening a "Physics
Against Cancer Center" and soliciting grants and gifts for same! The Chemists have utterly failed after 100 years of seeking the cure that would bring in billions from pharmaceutical companies!

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.