Toshiba Introduces High Power, High Flux 90 Lumen White LED

July 8, 2008
TL12W02-D
TL12W02-D

Toshiba today announced TL12W02-D, a new high power, high brightness white LED for commercial, residential and industrial lighting applications that can provide a typical flux of 90 lumens (lm) when driven at only 250mA. T he new LED will be available from Marktech Optoelectronics, the value-added reseller for TAEC's LED products in North America.

The Toshiba TL12W02-D is a higher brightness LED, which joins the TL12W01-D, with typical flux of 40 lm at 250mA , in Toshiba's expanding selection of high power white LEDs. In order to broaden the overall product portfolio to address different lighting requirements in the market, warm white LEDs are scheduled for release within the next few months.

"The new TL12W02-D surface mount white LED is ideally suited for many residential and commercial lighting applications that have previously used incandescent lamps," said Roger Shih, business development engineer for the optoelectronics group at TAEC. "Demand for white LEDs is increasing for general lighting applications because they offer long operating life, low power consumption and compact size compared to incandescent lamps."

With regards to production quality and expertise, "Toshiba has brought its world class manufacturing capabilities into the high power LED market and is able to provide a consistent selection of white LEDs with only a few bins," said Steve Hubert, director of purchasing, for Marktech.

"As a result, we are able to offer luminosity sorting to enable our customers to focus more attention on their application than on the LED they have selected for their design." Marktech Optoelectronics has been an industry leader in the application and design of LEDs for more than 20 years and has been selected by TAEC to handle North American technical sales and marketing for Toshiba LEDs and Constant Current LED Drivers.

The new 90 lm white LED has a low thermal resistance package that provides improved heat release characteristics, and the forward voltage for the new device is rated at 6.8V (typical) at 250mA . Its surface-mount package measures 10.5mm x 5.0mm x 2.1mm (including leads).

The Toshiba family of white LED products features low power consumption, wide operating temperature range of -40°C to 100°C, compact size and long operating life, which meet the requirements for a broad range of commercial, residential and industrial applications.

Samples of Toshiba's TL12W02-D will be available now, priced at $2.90 each in 10,000 piece quantities. Mass production is scheduled for July 2008.

Source: Toshiba

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