Tomato scare ending; fears linger for many people

July 19, 2008 By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR , Associated Press Writer
Tomato scare ending; fears linger for many people (AP)
Sean Meagher works on a vegetable display in the produce department of a Cincinnati supermarket, Wednesday, July 16, 2008, Troubled by the tainted tomato scare, nearly half of Americans are concerned they may get sick from eating contaminated food and are avoiding items they normally would buy, a new Associated Press-Ipsos poll has found. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

(AP) -- The tomato scare may be over, but it has taken a toll - it's cost the industry an estimated $100 million and left millions of people with a new wariness about the safety of everyday foods.

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