Tomato scare ending; fears linger for many people

July 19, 2008 By RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR , Associated Press Writer
Tomato scare ending; fears linger for many people (AP)
Sean Meagher works on a vegetable display in the produce department of a Cincinnati supermarket, Wednesday, July 16, 2008, Troubled by the tainted tomato scare, nearly half of Americans are concerned they may get sick from eating contaminated food and are avoiding items they normally would buy, a new Associated Press-Ipsos poll has found. (AP Photo/Al Behrman)

(AP) -- The tomato scare may be over, but it has taken a toll - it's cost the industry an estimated $100 million and left millions of people with a new wariness about the safety of everyday foods.



Content from The Associated Press expires 15 days after original publication date. For more information about The Associated Press, please visit www.ap.org .

Explore further: Experts to study food safety of oilfield wastewater

Related Stories

Experts to study food safety of oilfield wastewater

January 13, 2016

More farmers in drought-stricken California are using oilfield wastewater to irrigate, and a new panel on Tuesday began taking one of the state's deepest looks yet at the safety of using the chemical-laced water on food crops.

Bio-digester supplies energy to 3000 farms

January 5, 2016

The principle of action of a cow's digestive system served as a model to create a container that receives organic waste, mostly livestock manure, where it is mixed with millions of bacteria to obtain natural gas consisting ...

How mold on space station flowers is helping get us to Mars

January 19, 2016

When Scott Kelly tweeted a picture of moldy leaves on the current crop of zinnia flowers aboard the International Space Station, it could have looked like the science was doomed. In fact, science was blooming stronger than ...

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.