Researchers say China's export trade impacts climate

July 29, 2008

Carnegie Mellon University's Christopher L. Weber argues that China's new title as the world's largest greenhouse gas emitter is at least partly due to consumption of Chinese goods in the West.

As the world's greatest athletes prepare to participate in the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, there is increasing concern from some athletes about the growing pollution caused by smoke and smog from coal-fired plants that helped boost Chinese exports 21 percent last quarter to a whopping $665 billion in trade.

"We found that in 2005, fully one-third of China's greenhouse gas emissions were due to production of exports. This proportion has risen quickly, from 12 percent in 1987 and only 21 percent in 2002," said Weber, a research professor in Carnegie Mellon's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Weber and a team of international researchers from Norway and the United Kingdom found that soaring exports and energy use caused Chinese emissions to rise to 6 percent of global CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. These results beg the question of who should be held responsible for China's immense growth in emissions.

The 1997 Kyoto accord on climate change did nothing to slow growth in China because, as a developing country, China is not required under the protocol to make cuts in carbon emissions — and that is not likely to change by 2012. China is desperate for energy to fuel the economic expansion that is pulling its citizens out of poverty, and despite bold investments in renewable energy sources and energy efficiency, much recent energy growth is coming from coal, the only traditional energy source in abundance in China.

Weber and colleagues Glen P. Peters of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dabo Guan of the University of Cambridge and Klaus Hubacek of the University of Leeds, urge the Chinese to clean up their production practices by working with business to audit energy consumption and develop a fund to help bankroll the installation of more efficient equipment in factories and power plants. However, the fact that such a large proportion of Chinese emissions are in exports means that the West must be responsible for helping the Chinese increase energy efficiency.

"It is clear that urgent improvements are needed, especially in China's electricity sector," Weber said. "Installing more renewable power and overcoming the financial and technological hurdles involved with new technologies such as carbon sequestration should be the first priority of both China and its export partners."

Source: Carnegie Mellon University

Explore further: Clean tech a top priority as Chinese president lands in US

Related Stories

Clean tech a top priority as Chinese president lands in US

September 22, 2015

Discussing how U.S. and Chinese experts and businesses can collaborate on nuclear energy, smarter electricity use and other clean technologies is a top agenda item as Chinese President Xi Jinping arrives in Seattle Tuesday, ...

Investment treaty between China and US key business goal

September 23, 2015

When Chinese President Xi Jinping addresses a meeting of some of the top names in Chinese and American business Wednesday, they may be most interested what he says about progress toward a treaty between the nations that would ...

Research explores future energy security of China

July 30, 2015

China needs to reduce its dependence on coal and improve the range of fuels it uses if it is to have long term energy security, according to new research from the University of East Anglia (UEA).

Lobster-Eye imager detects soft X-ray emissions

July 28, 2015

Solar winds are known for powering dangerous space weather events near Earth, which, in turn, endangers space assets. So a large interdisciplinary group of researchers, led by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration ...

Recommended for you

Could 'The Day After Tomorrow' happen?

October 9, 2015

A researcher from the University of Southampton has produced a scientific study of the climate scenario featured in the disaster movie 'The Day After Tomorrow'.

Image: Sentinel-1A captures Azore islands

October 9, 2015

This Sentinel-1A radar image was processed to depict water in blue and land in earthen colours. It features some of the Azore islands about 1600 km west of Lisbon, including the turtle-shaped Faial, the dagger-like Sao Jorge ...


Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

3.7 / 5 (3) Jul 29, 2008
Buy Chinese, Kill a Polar Bear.

What will Wal-Mart do?
2.3 / 5 (3) Jul 30, 2008
Most likely, kill the polar bear.
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 04, 2008
It's the West's fault that China is polluting?
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 05, 2008
Another plan to ship money out of the 'developed' nations to the 'developing'.
2.3 / 5 (3) Aug 05, 2008
It's the West's fault that China is polluting?
Actually, yes; the West exported its smokestack industries to the developing nations, and buys back the products manufactured there.

Were, for example, the U.S. to repatriate such industries, and consume their output at a rate equal to current imports, our CO2 emissions would be roughly 30% higher than at present.

Our conspicuous consumption generates greenhouse gases & numerous pollutants abroad.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.