Japanese scientists create microscopic noodle bowl

May 29, 2008 By MARI YAMAGUCHI, Associated Press Writer
Japanese scientists create microscopic noodle bowl (AP)
In this Dec., 2006 photomicrograph released Thursday, May 29, 2008 by The Nakao Hamaguchi Laboratory of the University of Tokyo, a "carbon nanotube ramen" in a bowl with diameter measuring one-thousandth of a millimeter (one-25,000th of an inch) produced by the university's mechanical engineering Prof. Masayuki Nakao and his students in a project aimed at developing nanotube-processing technology is shown. "We believe it's the world's smallest ramen bowl, with the smallest portion of noodles inside, though they're not edible," Nakao said. The microscopic bowl was first created in December 2006, but was only revealed Thursday after it was entered for a microphotography competition this month. (AP Photo/The Nakao Hamaguchi Laboratory of the University of Tokyo)

(AP) -- Japanese scientists say they have used cutting-edge technology to create a noodle bowl so small it can be seen only through a microscope.



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Mercury_01
not rated yet May 30, 2008
it looks delicious.

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