Discovery Launch Date to be Finalized Today

May 19, 2008
Discovery Launch Date to be Finalized Today
Workers in the payload changeout room on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center check the placement of space shuttle Discovery's payload bay doors as they close around the Japanese Experiment Module - Pressurized Module. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

Top NASA officials are gathered today at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to assess preparations for space shuttle Discovery's STS-124 mission to the International Space Station. Known as the Flight Readiness Review, the meeting is expected to include the selection of an official launch date. Discovery is targeted to launch May 31 at 5:02 p.m. EDT.

A press conference is scheduled to announce the findings of the review. Participants will include Associate Administrator for Space Operations Bill Gerstenmaier, Space Shuttle Program Manager John Shannon, International Space Station Program Manager Mike Suffredini and STS-124 Assistant Launch Director Ed Mango. The event will be carried live on NASA TV.

During the STS-124 mission, space shuttle Discovery and a seven-member astronaut crew will deliver the tour-bus-sized Japanese Experiment Module-Pressurized Module and accompanying robotic arm system to the International Space Station.

Source: NASA

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Mercury_01
not rated yet May 19, 2008
That thing belongs in a museum.

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