Statins shown to lower blood pressure

April 14, 2008

A large, randomized drug trial has shown for the first time that statin drugs result in a modest, but significant, reduction in blood pressure. These effects may contribute to the reduced risk of stroke and cardiovascular events reported for patients on statins, according to lead investigator Beatrice Golomb, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and director of UC San Diego’s Statin Study.

The results of the double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 973 men and women in Southern California will be published in the April 14 edition of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

“Statins, of course, are known to lower LDL cholesterol levels, but lower LDL cholesterol levels are not generally linked to lower occurrence of stroke,” said Golomb. “However, lower blood pressure is strongly related to lower stroke risk, and these findings provide one means by which statins may reduce rates of stroke and other cardiovascular events in patients.”

Study participants had no known cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Equal numbers of participants were either given 20 milligrams of simvastatin, 40 milligrams of pravastatin or a placebo daily for six months. Reductions in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings occurred in patients taking both simvastatin and pravastatin, two forms of statin drugs.

“We found that statins lower both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and that the effect extends to patients with pre-hypertension, those with normal blood pressure and persons not on blood-pressure lowering medications,” said Golomb. “While reductions in blood pressure with statins were measurable as early as one month into the trial, the lowered blood pressure was significant at six months.”

Source: University of California - San Diego

Explore further: Gravity, who needs it? NASA studies your body in space

Related Stories

Gravity, who needs it? NASA studies your body in space

November 18, 2015

What happens to your body in space? NASA's Human Research Program has been unfolding answers for over a decade. Space is a dangerous, unfriendly place. Isolated from family and friends, exposed to radiation that could increase ...

Treating pulmonary diseases using Alaska pollock gelatin

October 23, 2015

In recent years, patients with pulmonary emphysema have been increasing mainly among middle-aged and elderly males due to aging and excessive smoking. Emphysema makes brittle lungs, and in severe cases, holes develop in the ...

How highly social mammals optimize group size

November 2, 2015

(—The sizes of social groups among mammals are driven by dynamics from within the group and a combination of pressures and incentives from outside. While aggregation and cooperation are often beneficial for species ...

MouthLab: Patients' vital signs are just a breath away

August 24, 2015

Engineers and physicians at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have developed a hand-held, battery-powered device that quickly picks up vital signs from a patient's lips and fingertip. Updated versions of the ...

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

( -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.