Desert power: A solar renaissance

April 1, 2008

What does the future hold for solar power? “Geotimes” magazine looks into more efficient ways of turning the sun’s power into electricity in its April cover story, “Desert Power: A Solar Renaissance.”

Solar power has regained popularity amid increasing fossil fuel costs and green initiatives. New technology has made this form of electricity generation even more economically appealing and efficient. Traditional solar panels convert light into energy, but new, more efficient solar thermal power plants focus the sun’s heat to produce energy directly.

“Geotimes” explores the plans for Desertec, a multi-national initiative that would use proposed solar thermal power plants in the deserts of Northern Africa and the Middle East to supply energy to Europe. Learn about the technological hurdles still left to cross to make this initiative a reality. As plans move forward for this major initiative, how does current legislation for both industry and tax law affect increased use of solar power in America"

Source: American Geological Institute

Explore further: Branson outlines world powered by wind, solar power

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