Great Lakes water issue on horizon

April 2, 2008

Ohio Lt. Gov. Lee Fisher says there is a possibility water from Lake Erie may one day be sold to other regions of the United States.

"I think it's fair to say that we're going to see in the next decade states and other countries looking for ways to get access to our fresh water supply and we're going to have to make some tough decisions about

whether we want that to happen and, if so, how," Fisher said at an economic development summit held at the University of Toledo's Lake Erie Center.

The Toledo Blade said a spokesman for Gov. Ted Strickland later said, "We do not support selling water from the Great Lakes."

A non-binding agreement passed in 1985 by Great Lakes governors unified the region to protect water from the Great Lakes from being diverted to the southwestern United States, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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