Study: Food additives may lower IQ

Apr 08, 2008

A British study suggests artificial color added to food and beverages could lower a child's intelligence.

Researchers at Southampton University said developmental damage from seven food additives could lower a child's IQ by up to five points, The Daily Telegraph reported Monday.

Britain's Food Standards Agency will meet Thursday to consider recommendations that manufacturers voluntarily remove six of the food additives from their products -- tartrazine, quinoline yellow, sunset yellow, carmoisine, ponceau, and allura red. Further research has been suggested for the seventh additive, the preservative sodium benzoate, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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User comments : 3

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Modernmystic
3.7 / 5 (3) Apr 08, 2008
Pffft...how about some of their actual data rather than a sensationalist claim? This article is THIN.
kimberelly
5 / 5 (1) Apr 08, 2008
Yeah.. there is not much research presented to back up these claims.. this article was not worth publishing without any evidence presented to back it up.
bfreewithrp
5 / 5 (1) Apr 08, 2008
Well, I will give my oppinion on this matter, IQ lowering or not.
News worthy article...Our foods are being robbed of nutrients.
http://www.health...ng.35176
Six Facts About Nutrient Losses Due to Food Processing
Simplicity in our food production is key

This article is about food.
http://www.gomest...ue.25342
Our Food is Quickly Loosing Its Nutritional Value

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