Biological clock test aimed at women

April 25, 2008

Doctors said a blood test being offered at U.S. fertility clinics may help determine if a woman's window of opportunity for conception is closing.

The fertility test, called Plan Ahead, provides an assessment of a woman's egg supply, Repromedix Corp. said in a release. The company said Plan Ahead enables a woman to compare her estimated egg supply with the normal range expected for women of the same age.

Richard Rawlins, director of the Centers for Advanced Reproductive Care at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, told the Chicago Tribune the test could help women who have had trouble conceiving decide if they want to go through in vitro fertilization.

The test, which costs $350, measures three hormones associated with the number of eggs in women's ovaries -- follicle stimulating hormone, anti-mullerian hormone and inhibin B.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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