Scientists test new prostate disease drug

Mar 27, 2008

A Canadian-headquartered biopharmaceutical company is conducting the second Phase 3 study of a new drug designed to treat prostate disease.

Aeterna Zentaris Inc. said the double-blind study to be conducted in Europe will test the clinical effectiveness of cetrorelix, a luteinizing hormone-releasing drug for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH -- a non-cancerous enlargement of the prostate that causes disturbances in urination.

In the second Phase 3 study, 400 male patients will enter a four-week, no-treatment observation period and then be randomly assigned to either receive cetrorelix or a placebo. Effectiveness will based on a test that measures the severity and stability of voiding prostate symptoms.

The company's first study of the effectiveness of cetrorelix began in April 2007 and is continuing in Canada, Europe and the United States.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: China to lift price controls on most drugs starting June 1

Related Stories

Compiling a 'dentist's handbook' for penis worms

50 minutes ago

It sounds like something out of a horror movie: a penis-shaped worm which was able to turn its mouth inside out and drag itself around by its tooth-lined throat, which resembled a cheese grater. But a new ...

Current tech boom is no dot-com bubble, experts say

4 hours ago

Silicon Valley's tech cup runneth over. Job growth is humming, coders are being lionized on HBO, Uber and its shared-economy cohorts are on fire, disrupted innovation is unfolding on every corner. And everyone from downtown ...

Recommended for you

GlaxoSmithKline opts to hold on to HIV business

2 hours ago

British-based drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline opted Wednesday to keep its stake in its stand-alone HIV business as it set out its strategy following a big deal with Switzerland's Novartis.

FDA petitioned to stop sales of essure implant

18 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Bayer's contraceptive implant Essure can cause serious complications and should be taken off the market, says a citizen's petition filed with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.