Researchers: Chia seeds are good for you

March 3, 2008

Several U.S. researchers maintain the seeds used in products such as Chia Pet are actually good for the human body, it was reported Sunday.

The research that determined the seeds are high in omega-3 fatty acids comes as the omega-3 supplement market in the United States is reaching new heights, the Chicago Tribune reported.

To date, the health trend is responsible for a $500 million-a-year industry as more U.S. citizens attempt to gain added health benefits from the products.

Chia seeds are derived from Salvia hispanica, a mint-related plant, and chia is regulated as a food by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

While research into the plant seeds has been minimal, the Tribune said one ounce of them has been found to contain 4 grams of protein, 11 grams of fiber and 137 calories.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Superfood chia seeds may be potential natural ingredient in food product development

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