Seniors struggle with chronic pain

February 22, 2008

A Canadian survey found that more than one-quarter of seniors living at home and 38 percent of those in institutions suffered from chronic pain.

Data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey showed that chronic pain affected 27 percent of seniors living in households, compared with 16 percent of people ages 18 to 64, Statistics Canada said in a release.

For the household population with severe pain, 53 percent stated that it interfered with most activities. Among institutional residents in severe pain, 64 percent reported major activity interference.

Seniors who experienced an increase in pain over a two-year period had greater odds of being unhappy, regardless of illness or other factors that would contribute to unhappiness, the report said.

Chronic pain among seniors in private households was more common than diabetes, heart disease and Alzheimer's disease. In institutions, only incontinence, arthritis and Alzheimer's disease were more common.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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