Oregon moose herd thriving in winter

February 19, 2008

Oregon's only moose herd appears to be thriving in the northeast mountains this winter, state wildlife biologist Pat Matthews said.

He said the deep snow and occasional sub zero temperatures are to the the animals' liking, The (Portland) Oregonian reported Monday.

"In the winter when it gets above 23 degrees, they start looking to cool themselves down," he said. "In the summer, anything above 60 degrees is too warm for them."

Moose watchers may even be able to see the elusive creatures this spring and summer by floating the Grande Ronde River between Minam and Troy or driving the now snow-covered U.S. Forest Service roads.

"They are very secretive and solitary animals, and they show up when they show up," Matthews said. "It took us a long time before we started seeing them."

The assistant district wildlife biologist with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife said the agency estimates that the population numbers about 38, but the herd could include up to 60 animals.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Yellowstone park proposes killing 1,000 bison this winter

Related Stories

Future uncertain for rare white deer at former weapons site

November 15, 2015

Hundreds of ghostly white deer roaming among overgrown munitions bunkers at a sprawling former Army weapons depot face an uncertain future after living and breeding largely undisturbed since the middle of last century.

Study proposes first nationwide wildlife conservation network

October 6, 2015

Wolves, elk and grizzly bears - some of the largest wild animals in America - are literally dying for more room to roam. But Alexander Fremier, associate professor in the School of the Environment at Washington State University, ...

Recommended for you


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.