NASA assigns STS-127, Expedition 19 crews

February 12, 2008

The U.S. space agency has assigned the crews for the STS-127 space shuttle mission and the Expedition 19 International Space Station mission.

The Endeavour space shuttle's STS-127 mission is to deliver the final components of the Japanese space agency's Kibo laboratory to the space station. Expedition 19 will double the size of the station's resident crew to six people.

Mark Polansky will command Endeavour for STS-127, targeted to launch in 2009. Marine Lt. Col. Douglas Hurley will serve as pilot, with astronauts Christopher Cassidy, Thomas Marshburn, David Wolf and Julie Payette, a Canadian Space Agency astronaut, onboard.

The mission will deliver U.S. Army Col. Timothy Kopra to the station to join Expedition 18 as a flight engineer and science officer and return Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata to Earth. Hurley, Cassidy, Marshburn and Kopra will be making their first trips into space.

The Japanese module will provide a type of "front porch" for experiments in the exposed space environment. The mission is to include five spacewalks.

Expedition 19 will be commanded by cosmonaut and Russian Air Force Col. Gennady Padalka.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Related Stories

Recommended for you

'Bathtub rings' suggest Titan's dynamic seas

July 28, 2015

Saturn's moon, Titan, is the only object in the Solar System other than Earth known to have liquid on its surface. While most of the lakes are found around the poles, the dry regions near the equator contain signs of evaporated ...

Born-again planetary nebula

July 28, 2015

Beneath the vivid hues of this eye-shaped cloud, named Abell 78, a tale of stellar life and death is unfolding. At the centre of the nebula, a dying star – not unlike our Sun – which shed its outer layers on its way to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.