New lure may replace soft plastic ones

February 25, 2008

A fishing aficionado from Waunakee, Wis., has created a new "Iron-Clad" fishing lure he hopes will replace problematic soft plastic lures.

The Washington Times said Sunday Ben Hobbins created his "Iron-Clad" reusable lures with the intent of having the advanced fishing bait replace the soft-plastic lures that wind up in waterways throughout the United States.

Nearly 25 million plastic lures, weighing a total of 12,000 tons, end up in U.S. lakes and rivers each year after being torn from fishing lines by fish or passing vegetation.

To help solve that problem, Hobbins strengthened such lures with resilient microfibers and less plastic. He says the new make-up of the lures should prevent them from breaking free.

"It's comparable to the 'use-and-lose' soft-plastic lures currently on the market. But these are nearly indestructible," Hobbins told the Times. "It stops soft-plastic waste in the environment. And that is substantial in itself. Anglers never wanted to drop the plastic, but that's all there was."

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Off the hook: Stronger soft-plastic fishing lure reels in raves

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