Children's IQs go up when parents learn

Feb 18, 2008

The IQs of preschool-aged children who belong to low-income families improved after parents took a child-learning course, University of Oregon experts said.

Researchers found that the intelligence scores of children ages 3 to 5 whose parents took an 8-week class about parenting techniques improved, The Washington Times reported Saturday.

The study included 28 children.

"Our findings are important because they suggest that kids who are at high risk for school failure can be helped through these interventions," researcher Courtney Stevens said.

The group of children whose parents underwent training showed an average IQ increase of 6 points, the study said. Children whose parents did not take the class reportedly showed no significant change.

The research is part of a large study of the brain development of high-risk children who participate in a federal Head Start program, the report said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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