Nurse tries to adopt patient's child

January 25, 2008

The Manitoba College of Registered Nurses disciplined a Canadian nurse for trying to adopt the child of one of her patients.

A notice of censure published in the college's quarterly journal said the unnamed nurse was delivering services to a young female patient with a learning disability who had decided to place her child for adoption. The nurse suggested she and her husband take the child and the patient agreed, the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. said Thursday.

The journal said the nurse ignored advice from the college that it was a conflict of interest to adopt the baby while maintaining a professional relationship. The CBC said it is not clear if the adoption was completed.

She was censured for "the abuse of the therapeutic relationship between the member and her client resulting in personal gain for the member," the journal said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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