New NASA aeronautics research chief named

January 21, 2008

The U.S. space agency has named Jaiwon Shin as its associate administrator for aeronautics research.

Shin will be responsible for managing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's aeronautics research portfolio, including research in the fundamental aeronautics of flight, aviation safety and the nation's airspace system. Prior to the appointment, Shin served as NASA's deputy associate administrator for aeronautics.

"Jaiwon brings expert knowledge of aeronautics and technology to a critical position at NASA," said NASA Administrator Michael Griffin said. "He's helped develop the aeronautics research road map for the 21st century. His leadership of the directorate will assure our continued recognition as the world's premiere aeronautics research organization."

Shin previously was chief of the aeronautics projects office at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. From 1998-2002, he served as chief of NASA's Aviation Safety Program Office as well being deputy program manager for NASA's Aviation Safety Program and Airspace Systems Program.

Shin received his doctorate in mechanical engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His bachelor's degree is from Yonsei University in South Korea and his master's degree is in mechanical engineering from the California State University-Long Beach.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: 40 years of safer aviation through reporting

Related Stories

40 years of safer aviation through reporting

September 29, 2016

The U.S. has an incredibly safe aviation system – it's unparalleled when compared to other modes of transportation. The basis for this historic safety record is that we identify and correct safety concerns before they become ...

Electric airplanes (batteries included)

August 25, 2016

If there were no need for massive batteries, electric propulsion could dramatically reduce aviation's contribution to climate change from carbon dioxide emissions. But what if the plane, itself, were the battery?

Modifications Completed on NASA's New Research Aircraft

January 23, 2008

NASA's S-3 Viking aircraft returned home to NASA's Glenn Research Center after extensive modifications to transform it from a carrier-based military aircraft to a state-of-the-art icing research aircraft.

Recommended for you

NASA missions harvest a passel of 'pumpkin' stars

October 27, 2016

Astronomers using observations from NASA's Kepler and Swift missions have discovered a batch of rapidly spinning stars that produce X-rays at more than 100 times the peak levels ever seen from the sun. The stars, which spin ...

A dead star's ghostly glow

October 27, 2016

The eerie glow of a dead star, which exploded long ago as a supernova, reveals itself in this NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the Crab Nebula. But don't be fooled. The ghoulish-looking object still has a pulse. Buried ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.