Millions of teens abusing cold medicines

Jan 11, 2008

A U.S. survey says millions of teenagers and young adults are getting high off non-prescription cough and cold medicines.

The government's Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration said 3 million young people in the United States between the ages of 12 and 25 admitted getting high off the medicines at least once. That number is comparable to LSD and more than the reported use of methamphetamines among those in the same age group.

The agency said overdosing on many cough and cold medications may result in serious life-threatening adverse reactions, including irregular heartbeat, delirium and death.

"Although non-prescription cough and cold medications are generally safe when taken for medicinal purposes and as directed on their labeling, they can induce severe dissociative, 'out-of-body' experiences when they are consumed in amounts far in excess of their recommended dosages," SAMHSA said Thursday in a release.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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BigTone
5 / 5 (1) Jan 11, 2008
The answer is simple... stop the rebellion by legalization (or decriminalization) - take a look at the Europeans and how they view our absurd alcohol laws... Our across the board "abstinence" style of rules for America's youths have little to no data that these programs are successful on a wide scale.

I always laugh at the "drug use is down" style headlines - it just means that kids are finding even more dangerous ways of getting a buzz.

There will always be bad apples in any environment and will abuse whatever system is in place - but lets not let those examples keep pushing us in the direction of insanity. Prohibition didn't work for adults and its not working for our youth...

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