New method for solving differential equations

January 24, 2008

Dutch-sponsored mathematician Valeriu Savcenco has developed new methods for the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. These so-called multirate methods are highly efficient for large systems, where some components exhibit more active behaviour than others within the same system.

Countless phenomena in various technological and scientific fields are formed by systems of ordinary differential equations. However for large systems of such equations, some components can exhibit more active behaviour than others.

Multirate methods can be a highly efficient approach for solving such problems numerically. In these methods a large time step can be taken for slowly varying components and small steps for components with a more rapid variation. Valeriu Savcenco discusses the design, analysis and experimental results of multirate methods for the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations.

This project is being carried out within the NWO Open Competition (now: Free Competition). The project is the first to have won the Peterich Prize. The Free Competition is intended for the best scientific project proposals that do not fall under the NWO themes.

Source: Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research

Explore further: Kinect research captures game play exertions

Related Stories

Kinect research captures game play exertions

July 17, 2015

A Kinect sensor has proved to be an unlikely tool to help estimate the amount of energy that people expend while they are playing video games that utilise the sensor technology.

Diode a few atoms thick shows surprising quantum effect

June 23, 2015

A quantum mechanical transport phenomenon demonstrated for the first time in synthetic, atomically-thin layered material at room temperature could lead to novel nanoelectronic circuits and devices, according to researchers ...

Recommended for you

French teen finds 560,000 year-old tooth (Update)

July 28, 2015

A 16-year-old French volunteer archaeologist has found an adult tooth dating back around 560,000 years in southwestern France, in what researchers hailed as a "major discovery" Tuesday.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.