Highest Antarctic icecap peak reached

January 13, 2008

A Chinese team culminated a 21-day quest to scale the highest peak on the Antarctic icecap Saturday when the 17 scientists reached the top of Dome A.

It was the second time Chinese scientists have reached the peak, Xinhua reported Saturday. Another team became the first to reach the summit Jan. 18, 2005, the state-run Chinese news agency said.

This time, the team faced strong winds and temperatures at least 22 degrees below zero Fahrenheit.

Scientist reported to Antarctica Changcheng Station that every member of the team was healthy and that challenging conditions at the 2.54-mile-high summit would not stop them from further exploring the icecap in preparation for building a third Chinese scientific research station in Antarctica , the official Chinese news service said.

The team, which left eastern Antarctica's Zhongshan Station Dec. 22 to begin its mission, is part of the 24th Antarctic expedition for China since 1984 when the first mission took place.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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