Scientists: Seaweed Could Stem Warming

Dec 08, 2007 By JOSEPH COLEMAN, Associated Press Writer
Group Touts Seaweed As Warming Weapon (AP)
An Indonesian woman tends to her seaweed farm off the beach Thursday Dec. 6, 2007 in Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia. Slimy, green and unsightly, seaweed and algae are among the humblest plants on earth, but a group of scientists at a climate conference in Bali say they could also be a potent weapon against global warming, sucking damaging carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere at greater rates than the mightiest rain forests. (AP Photo/Ed Wray)

(AP) -- Slimy, green and unsightly, seaweed and algae are among the humblest of plants. A group of scientists at a climate conference in Bali say they could also be a potent weapon against global warming, capable of sucking damaging carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere at rates comparable to the mightiest rain forests.



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