Study: Fever may ease autism for a while

December 24, 2007

Anecdotes about fevers triggering "normal" behavior in autistic children now have a scientific study to back them, researchers in Baltimore report.

Dr. Andrew W. Zimmerman, a pediatric neurologist, and colleagues found fever-induced improvements, although fleeting, did occur in more than 80 percent of the 30 autistic children they studied, the Baltimore Sun reported Monday.

The scientists said they didn't know what sparked the changes or why they occurred in some children and not others. But they said the observations provide new insight into what is occurring in an autistic child's brain and how it may be treated one day.

"If we could understand what's going on with this, we might be able to understand autism better and be in a better position to treat it," said Zimmerman, director of medical research at Kennedy Krieger's Center for Autism and Related Disorders.

The findings were published in the December issue of Pediatrics.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Therapeutic riding is so much more than horse play

Related Stories

Recovery from autism

September 13, 2010

( -- A University of Connecticut expert says early intervention can help some children recover from autism.

Research suggests children can recover from autism

May 8, 2009

(AP) -- Leo Lytel was diagnosed with autism as a toddler. But by age 9 he had overcome the disorder. His progress is part of a growing body of research that suggests at least 10 percent of children with autism can "recover" ...

Evidence lacking for special diets in autism

January 4, 2010

(AP) -- An expert panel says there's no rigorous evidence that digestive problems are more common in children with autism compared to other children, or that special diets work, contrary to claims by celebrities and vaccine ...

Recommended for you

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

( -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.