Study: Insured Cancer Patients Do Better

Dec 20, 2007 By MIKE STOBBE, AP Medical Writer
Study: Insured Cancer Patients Do Better (AP)
Chart shows screening percentages for breast and colon cancer

(AP) -- Uninsured cancer patients are nearly twice as likely to die within five years as those with private coverage, according to the first national study of its kind and one that sheds light on troubling health care obstacles.



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