Cambodian dengue education called poor

December 5, 2007

Medical researchers say Cambodian education regarding prevention, diagnosis and treatment of dengue fever is insufficient, underfunded and irregular.

Scientists say dengue fever, caused by a mosquito-transmitted virus, has become a significant public health problem in Cambodia, where an epidemic resulted in 34,542 cases and 365 deaths nationwide between January and August.

In Cambodia, health education for dengue control is provided in primary schools, at village health centers, and by the National Dengue Control Program.

However, the study by Dr. Sokrin Khun from Cambodia's Ministry of Health and Professor Lenore Manderson from Monash University in Australia suggests the educational programs are accorded low priority, strategies and materials are not evaluated on a routine basis, messages are sometimes confusing, and the health staff lacks the training, time and opportunities to deliver educational messages.

The research is published in the PLoS journal Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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