Storm names can boost insurance costs

November 30, 2007

Some meteorologists say the National Hurricane Center is giving out more storm names, which can mean higher costs for homeowners.

Former hurricane center director Neil Frank told The Houston Chronicle that as many as six of this year's 14 named tropical systems might have failed in the past to earn tropical storm status.

The newspaper said the number of a season's named storms is used to determine trends in hurricane activity, which are then used by insurance companies to set homeowners' rates.

Forecasters at the hurricane center say the practice of naming tropical storms has remained consistent over the past two decades.

Scientists, however, generally agree that before widespread satellite coverage, hurricane watchers annually missed one to three tropical storms that developed far from land or were too brief to register with older technology, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: NASA sees compact Tropical Storm Frank weakening

Related Stories

NASA gets last looks at former Tropical Storm Darby

July 26, 2016

Tropical Storm Darby weakened to a remnant low pressure system in the Central Pacific Ocean today, July 26. NASA's Aqua satellite and RapidScat instrument provided a "last look" at Darby when it was still a tropical storm ...

Recommended for you

Keep a lid on it: Geologists probe geological carbon storage

July 28, 2016

Effective carbon capture and storage or "CCS" in underground reservoirs is one possible way to meet ambitious climate change targets demanded by countries and international partnerships around the world. But are current technologies ...

Monsoon intensity enhanced by heat captured by desert dust

July 28, 2016

Variations in the ability of sand particles kicked into the atmosphere from deserts in the Middle East to absorb heat can change the intensity of the Indian Summer Monsoon, according to new research from The University of ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.