Midwest governors endorse renewable energy

November 16, 2007

Governors from nine Midwest states meeting in Wisconsin have signed a pact to cut greenhouse gas emissions and promote renewable energy.

The Midwestern Regional Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord was signed Thursday by leaders from Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Kansas, Ohio and South Dakota at a meeting of the Midwestern Governors Association Energy Security and Climate Change Summit. Manitoba Premier Gary Doer was also a signatory.

The agreement was designed as a regional strategy to achieve energy security and reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming, the office of Wisconsin Gov. Jim Doyle said in a release.

Doyle, who serves as chairman of the group, highlighted the economic benefits.

"Leaders from across the Midwest are charting a new energy direction for our citizens, our nation and our world, creating high-paying jobs for our citizens and building a cleaner and safer world for generations to come," he said. "Our strong manufacturing base and rich agricultural industries, along with the wealth of resources in our vast northern forests and our world-leading research universities, position the Midwest to become the Saudi Arabia of renewable energy."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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