Electronics waste an environmental test

November 11, 2007

U.S. environmental groups and consumer electronics groups warn electronic waste is adding dangerous levels of lead to the environment.

The Environmental Protection Agency said U.S. residents tossed 2.2 million tons of electronics equipment into landfills in 2005, with only about 15 percent of that being recycled.

Some environmental analysts say the disposal of electronics poses a considerable threat to the environment, CBS News reported.

"Our laboratory studies that we did showed the lead leakage from these was quite significant," said John Schert, executive director of the Center for Solid and Hazardous Waste Management at the University of Florida.

The EPA used Schert's analysis to designate cathode ray tubes from television sets and monitors as hazardous waste, highlighting the challenge to handle electronic waste effectively.

Sony recently took the initiative to start a nationwide recycling program to handle its electronics waste,CBS reported.

"Our goal for this program is also for every pound of product we put on the market, we want to take a pound back," Mark Small, Sony's vice president for environment, told CBS.

The program allows consumers to take their electronics waste to select waste management "e-cycling" centers.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Yarn from slaughterhouse waste

Related Stories

Yarn from slaughterhouse waste

July 29, 2015

ETH researchers have developed a yarn from ordinary gelatine that has good qualities similar to those of merino wool fibers. Now they are working on making the yarn even more water resistant.

Where is solar power headed?

July 22, 2015

Most experts agree that to have a shot at curbing the worst impacts of climate change, we need to extricate our society from fossil fuels and ramp up our use of renewable energy.

New material releases stored heat under weak pressure

July 14, 2015

Researchers at the University of Tokyo have discovered a new type of material which stores heat energy for a prolonged period, which they have termed a "heat storage ceramic." This new material can be used as heat storage ...

Recommended for you

Study calculates the speed of ice formation

August 3, 2015

Researchers at Princeton University have for the first time directly calculated the rate at which water crystallizes into ice in a realistic computer model of water molecules. The simulations, which were carried out on supercomputers, ...

'Snowball earth' might be slushy

August 3, 2015

Imagine a world without liquid water—just solid ice in all directions. It would certainly not be a place that most life forms would like to live.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.