New volume chronicles recent insights into Earth's interior

Oct 03, 2007

A new volume published by the Geological Society of America focuses on techniques that have opened new windows of observation into Earth processes. Advances in High-Pressure Mineralogy highlights recent technical developments in high-pressure mineral physics as well as new results that have changed our understanding of Earth's deep interior.

Editor of the book is Eiji Ohtani, Institute of Mineralogy, Petrology, and Economic Geology, Faculty of Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan.

Part 1 investigates phase transitions in silicates in Earth and planetary materials at high pressure. Studies address Earth's surface, including silicates found in meteorites, as well as those found in the upper mantle, transition zone, and lower mantle. These transformations provide a basis for understanding many of Earth's dynamic processes.

Part 2 focuses on the role of volatiles in the mantle. Agents of chemical differentiation, volatiles play an important role in the generation of magma. Also included are studies of diamond genesis, phase relations in ice, and the controversial subject of water circulation in deep Earth.

Part 3 examines recent advances in experimental and theoretical techniques. Nuclear resonant spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies, multi-anvil technology, and X-ray imaging are among the techniques described.

Source: Geological Society of America

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