Six staph cases reported in North Carolina

October 19, 2007

School officials in Winston-Salem, N.C., said six football players at East Forsyth High School were found to have drug-resistant staph infections.

The infection, caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), is highly contagious and resistant to treatment with antibiotics, The Winston-Salem (N.C.) Journal said Thursday.

The first infection was confirmed Sept. 7.

Athletes who participate in sports that require close contact are more likely to catch staph infections, the newspaper said.

North Carolina recently passed a law that will require hospitals to collect information on MRSA infection rates and make the information public.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Near-perfect antibacterial materials

Related Stories

Near-perfect antibacterial materials

February 19, 2015

Ruthless with bacteria, harmless to human cells. New, durable antibacterial coatings of nanocomposites, developed at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, will in future help to ...

Wireless electronic implants stop staph, then dissolve

November 24, 2014

Researchers at Tufts University, in collaboration with a team at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, have demonstrated a resorbable electronic implant that eliminated bacterial infection in mice by delivering ...

Recommended for you

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...

Quantum Theory May Explain Wishful Thinking

April 14, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Humans don’t always make the most rational decisions. As studies have shown, even when logic and reasoning point in one direction, sometimes we chose the opposite route, motivated by personal bias or simply ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.