Think Solar Solutions: Outdoor Lantern & World Band Radio

October 1, 2007 by Mary Anne Simpson weblog

Several new solar powered items caught my eye. The Discovery Outdoor Lantern has a multi-source power solution for camping and outdoor activities. In a fixed position it becomes an incandescent spotlight. The World Band Solar & Dynamo Powered Radio has a total of four alternative energy sources. It provides access to emergency services and radio frequencies.

Thinking about alternative energy solutions is not only wise, but it could be a short term emergency necessity. The following products utilize solar power and convert to a standard 12V DC power sources.

Discovery Solar Powered Outdoor Lantern:

A noteworthy products utilizing solar power is available from the Discovery Store. The Solar Powered Outdoor Lantern runs on a built-in, rechargeable solar battery. The battery may also be recharged using a 12V DC power source. The products isuseful for emergency sources of light or for camping rips and other outdoor uses.

The Solar Powered Outdoor Lantern has a 4-watt fluorescent tube that has full circle illumination capability. In a fixed position, the lantern becomes an incandescent spotlight. The lantern has a four hour lighting capacity for a single charge. The lantern comes with a 12V car adaptor.

The convenient size 9 inches long by 4.5 inches wide and 4 inches high make it a great accessory for camping and rafting or other outdoor activities. The Solar Powered Lantern weighs less than three pounds. It sells for less than $50 and will be available in early October, 2007.

The World Band Solar & Dynamo Powered Radio:

The 11 band World Band Solar keeps the user in touch with emergency services, weather, international broadcasts, AM/FM radio and TV stations when a regular power source is unavailable. The World Band Solar & Dynamo Powered Radio comes with a built-in hand generator and a self-contained solar cell for solar charges. It can also be charged from an AC/DC or a car cigarette lighter.

The convenient size of the World Band Solar & Dynamo Radio makes it a highly portable device. It measures three inches deep by nine inches wide and less than six inches high. The radio is made with Toshiba components which provides for good quality listening. The item comes with four AA Ni-cad rechargeable batteries. In addition, the radio comes with exclusively designed ear plugs, and an AC/DC plug. The 12 V car charger cable is available, but not included with the radio.

The World Band radio will provide seven hours of listening from a single charge. The LED indicator light will forewarn the user when the battery is getting low. The product is definitely a multi-source powered band radio.

The product is new on the market and the introductory price is $105 and an additional shipping cost of $12.95. The product is sold on-line by Global Merchants.

Explore further: Organometal trihalide perovskite solar cells with conversion efficiencies of 20.1%

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