Office jobs may be hazardous to the hips

October 12, 2007

A new survey says working in an office may be hard on the waistlines of nearly half of U.S. workers.

The survey of more than 5,600 workers, conducted by Harris Interactive for CareerBuilder.com, found that 28 percent of workers have gained more than 10 pounds and 13 percent have gained more than 20 pounds in their current jobs.

Snacking at their desks and eating too much fast food may be part of the problem. The survey found that 58 percent of the workers eat out at work for lunch at least once a week, with more than 12 percent eating out five times a week for lunch.

Some workers said they don't even make it outside the building for lunch, opting to grab something quick from a vending machine. Thirty-eight percent said they eat more junk food at the office than at home and 13 percent said they don't usually eat fruit or vegetables during the work week.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Indians crowd rivers, shady trees as heat toll passes 1,400

Related Stories

More than 2,200 confirmed dead in Nepal earthquake

April 26, 2015

A powerful aftershock shook Nepal on Sunday, making buildings sway and sending panicked Kathmandu residents running into the streets a day after a massive earthquake left more than 2,200 people dead.

Finding  the next famine

March 9, 2015

Last year, Christopher Hillbruner, N07, had 10 countries on the front burner, all in danger of boiling over. In Central America, drought and an epidemic of coffee rust had reduced crop yields and driven down wages, making ...

Recommended for you

Machine Translates Thoughts into Speech in Real Time

December 21, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- By implanting an electrode into the brain of a person with locked-in syndrome, scientists have demonstrated how to wirelessly transmit neural signals to a speech synthesizer. The "thought-to-speech" process ...

Quantum Theory May Explain Wishful Thinking

April 14, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Humans don’t always make the most rational decisions. As studies have shown, even when logic and reasoning point in one direction, sometimes we chose the opposite route, motivated by personal bias or simply ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.