FDA expands meningitis vaccine approval

October 22, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expanded approval for the use of Menactra, a bacterial meningitis vaccine, to children ages 2 to 10.

Menactra was first approved by the FDA in January 2005 for people ages 11 to 55. The vaccine Menomune was previously the only meningococcal vaccine available in the United States for use in children ages 2 and older, the FDA said Thursday in a release.

Both products are manufactured by Sanofi Pasteur Inc. of Swiftwater, Pa.

Meningitis, a serious inflammation of the lining that surrounds the spinal cord and brain, can cause death or permanent brain injury.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: FDA expands meningitis vaccine age range

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