Ancient elephant bones found in Calif.

Oct 22, 2007

A construction crew digging a foundation for a new county building in Stockton, Calif., uncovered the bones of a prehistoric elephant.

Greg Anderson, a biology professor at University of the Pacific in Stockton, said he thinks the bones are from a mammoth, The Sacramento Bee said Friday.

The discovery apparently isn't particularly rare.

"Mammoths are not uncommon in construction sites in most of California," paleontologist Bruce Hanson, who is scheduled to examine the discovery, told the newspaper.

San Joaquin County plans to donate the bones to the University of California, Berkeley.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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