Ancient elephant bones found in Calif.

October 22, 2007

A construction crew digging a foundation for a new county building in Stockton, Calif., uncovered the bones of a prehistoric elephant.

Greg Anderson, a biology professor at University of the Pacific in Stockton, said he thinks the bones are from a mammoth, The Sacramento Bee said Friday.

The discovery apparently isn't particularly rare.

"Mammoths are not uncommon in construction sites in most of California," paleontologist Bruce Hanson, who is scheduled to examine the discovery, told the newspaper.

San Joaquin County plans to donate the bones to the University of California, Berkeley.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Brown's influential biomechanics X-ray technology grows ever more powerful

Related Stories

How a researcher discovered a completely undocumented whale

November 30, 2016

One evening in November 2013, the noted whale researcher Salvatore Cerchio sat down to dinner with his team of scientists on Nosy Iranja, a small island known for its white sands and turquoise waters that's located off the ...

How the heart turns into bone

November 17, 2016

Connective tissue cells in the heart turn into bone-producing cells in response to injury, University of California, Los Angeles scientists report November 17 in Cell Stem Cell. The discovery helps explain why some people ...

Early California: A killing field

February 13, 2006

Research shatters utopian myth, finds Indians decimated bird "The wild geese and every species of water fowl darkened the surface of every bay � in flocks of millions�. When disturbed, they arose to fly. The ...

Recommended for you

Evaluation of scientific rigor in animal research

December 2, 2016

The "reproducibility crisis" in biomedical research has led to questions about the scientific rigor in animal research, and thus the ethical justification of animal experiments. In research publishing in the Open Access journals ...

Researchers find evidence of original 1620 Plymouth settlement

November 30, 2016

Three hundred and ninety-five years after Pilgrims celebrated the first Thanksgiving in Plymouth, Massachusetts, researchers from UMass Boston's Andrew Fiske Memorial Center for Archaeological Research can say they have definitively ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.