Santa Susana lab facing major cleanup

September 11, 2007

California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is considering a bill that would force Boeing and NASA to clean up their Santa Susana Field Lab.

The bill comes nearly two decades after it was revealed that the lab, just 30 miles from Los Angeles, was full of toxic and radioactive contamination, the Los Angeles Daily News reported.

The U.S. Department of Energy has been ordered by a judge to begin a new study of the radioactive and chemical contamination at its former nuclear research facility and the state agency responsible for controlling toxic contamination has appointed a new project manager who promised to be open with the public.

"Our approach to the project has changed," said Norman Riley, project manager for the California Department of Toxic Substances Control since April. "We have some new people involved and a renewed commitment to transparency about our involvement and efforts on the project."

The state agency signed an order last month, giving Boeing, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration a deadline of 2017 to complete the site cleanup.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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