NASA selects space radiation projects

September 25, 2007

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has selected 17 space radiation projects by U.S. researchers for development.

The projects, in partnership with the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, will be designed to reduce the health risks crews of missions to the moon and Mars might face from exposure to space radiation. Scientists at universities, research institutions and private companies in eight states will conduct the studies that will aid in the development of effective shielding or biological countermeasures for radiation exposure.

The 17 projects were selected from 98 proposals received from academia and government laboratories. The total potential value of the selected proposals is about $15 million, NASA said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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