Experimental drug boosts survival in recurrent ovarian cancer

Sep 27, 2007

New clinical data showed an experimental drug called pertuzumab prolonged the survival time for women with recurrent ovarian cancer, a University of Alabama at Birmingham doctor said recently.

The data was presented Sept. 24 during a scientific session of the 14th European Cancer Conference held in Barcelona, Spain. The session’s main speaker was Sharmila Makhija, M.D., an associate professor in UAB’s Division of Gynecologic Oncology.

Makhija said Phase II clinical trial data showed that pertuzumab added weeks to the lives of Stage 3 ovarian cancer patients whose disease had returned after treatment with existing chemotherapy regimens.

In the study, pertuzumab was administered in combination with a standard chemotherapy agent sometime after the initial treatments had been given, and after the re-emergence of cancer. Makhija said the new combination added weeks to the standard survival period for recurrent patients, and the drug combo was well-tolerated by the body and caused minimal side effects.

"We wanted to know if pertuzumab would improve the effects of the chemotherapy with cancer recurrence, and if it would improve their lives. It did," Makhija said. "Now we want to see if it impacts overall survival."

Once ovarian cancer becomes resistant to multiple types of chemotherapy, fewer treatment options exist and the focus becomes lengthening patients’ survival periods.

The pertuzumab trial included 130 women enrolled by UAB, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center in Boston, University of Kentucky Chandler Medical Center’s Markey Cancer Center in Lexington, Women and Infants’ Hospital of Rhode Island in Providence, Sharp Rees-Stealy Medical Group in San Diego, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. Study costs were paid by Genentech Inc. in South San Francisco, Calif.

Makhija presented the same results earlier this year at the 2007 American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago.

Makhija said the Phase II study is now closed, and researchers are in the planning stages for a larger Phase 3 study of pertuzumab set to include hundreds of U.S. women.

Pertuzumab is approved only for experimental uses. It falls within a class of anticancer agents called monoclonal antibodies. Such drugs target key signaling pathways within cells that can stop or slow tumor growth.

Source: University of Alabama at Birmingham

Explore further: Second-line cetuximab active beyond progression in quadruple wild-type patients with mCRC

Related Stories

Hubble view: Wolf-Rayet stars, intense and short-lived

37 minutes ago

This NASA/European Space Agency (ESA) Hubble Space Telescope picture shows a galaxy named SBS 1415+437 (also called SDSS CGB 12067.1), located about 45 million light-years from Earth. SBS 1415+437 is a Wolf-Rayet ...

Five properties of physics that affect your gas mileage

45 minutes ago

Physics is inescapable. It's everywhere, making your Frisbees fly, your toilets flush and your pasta water boil at a lower temperature at altitude. We've harnessed these forces, along with chemistry and engineering, ...

Recommended for you

Spicy treatment the answer to aggressive cancer?

Jul 03, 2015

It has been treasured by food lovers for thousands of years for its rich golden colour, peppery flavour and mustardy aroma…and now turmeric may also have a role in fighting cancer.

Cancer survivors who smoke perceive less risk from tobacco

Jul 02, 2015

Cancer survivors who smoke report fewer negative opinions about smoking, have more barriers to quitting, and are around other smokers more often than survivors who had quit before or after their diagnosis, according to a ...

Melanoma mutation rewires cell metabolism

Jul 02, 2015

A mutation found in most melanomas rewires cancer cells' metabolism, making them dependent on a ketogenesis enzyme, researchers at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University have discovered.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.