On demand FB cell phone replays created

September 27, 2007

People attending Purdue University home football games this fall might be the first U.S. college fans able to call up instant replays on their cell phones.

Purdue's e-Stadium is believed the first service to offer access to instant replays by demand on cell phones without charge.

Fans attending football games at Purdue's Ross-Ade Stadium in West Lafayette, Ind., can use cell phones that have Internet capability to demand and view replays from as many as six camera angles and to sort the replays to find videos involving particular players or types of plays.

Current game statistics, scores of other games in progress, and biographical information of players and coaches also are available.

Associate Professor James Krogmeier, co-director of Purdue's Center for Wireless Systems and Applications, said other features are being added.

"This research will be used in many areas other than sports," said Purdue Athletic Director Morgan Burke. "Here in Ross-Ade Stadium, you have a big audience the researchers can tap into as a test bed, but there are many other areas of society that will benefit from what we are learning about wireless technology."

Because of TV licensing, only people in the stadium will be able to view the content.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Cheat-Resistant 3D iPhone Game Relies on Score-Checking Replays (w/ Video)

Related Stories

Technology gets a boost in Tampa

February 2, 2009

NBC will have the field completely covered for the Super Bowl so viewers can get just about every angle on every play. The broadcast will use 36 cameras, up from the 22-23 used for a regular Sunday night game. This includes ...

Explained: Ad hoc networks

March 10, 2011

In recent years, many network scientists have turned their attention away from centralized networks — such as the Internet and the cell-phone network -- and toward ad hoc networks, wireless networks formed on the fly ...

Recommended for you

Glider pilots aim for the stratosphere

November 20, 2015

Talk about serendipity. Einar Enevoldson was strolling past a scientist's office in 1991 when he noticed a freshly printed image tacked to the wall. He was thunderstruck; it showed faint particles in the sky that proved something ...


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.